Webinar Replay: How To Beat The Facebook Algorithm Changes

The new Facebook algorithm changes (Facebook Zero) are creating a ton of panic for online business owners and bloggers, but there are strategic steps that can be taken to beat the algorithm changes.

In this Webinar, attendees are shown how to set up a weekly live show via Facebook, how to use that show to grow your list and brand and how to repurpose this content across your social media outlets and blog.

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Transcript

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Eric:

Hey everyone, welcome to this month’s Type-A Webinar. We have Jenny, Melrose with us today. She’s going to be talking about how to beat the Facebook algorithm changes. Just want to remind everyone if you haven’t gotten your ticket yet for Type-A Conference in Chicago, rates go up in about two weeks, either April 1st or 2nd – depends if I’m working on Easter Sunday or not and ticket prices will never be any lower. They’re going to go up every single month. So if you’re waiting for some sort of Fourth of July sale or something, it’s not going to happen. I can tell you that right now. If you do already have your ticket: awesome. Thank you. But make sure you also get your room at The Drake. We have more people registered for the conference than our room block at The Drake. So I know a lot of people share rooms. They go two, three, four rooms sometimes we’re going to sell out. So the link is in the conference Facebook group. It’s in almost every single email that goes out. So take a look at those emails. If you have any questions, you can drop me a note, eric@typeaparent.com

This is Jenny, from JennyMelrose.com and she’s going to be talking about beat the Facebook algorithm changes. Um, let’s see. Jenny, you were a kindergarten teacher, right? Or, teacher – not kindergarten. I just kind of made that up.

Jenny:

No, you’re totally fine. Was an inner city school district reading specialists. I taught actually kindergarten through fifth grade.

Eric:

Yeah. And then, um, and then you started blogging and blogging kind of took off for you and then you decided that this blogging thing was working out better for you than teaching and decided to leave that and now you work with all sorts of national brands and such and um, you’re speaking, you spoke before at our conference too I believe, right?

Jenny:

Not a Type-A. I have spoken at various other conferences but not a type A, which I’m very excited to Chicago for the first time to speak.

Eric:

Wait, you’ve never been to Chicago either?

Jenny:

I haven’t been to Chicago believe it or not I’m actually from the northeast, New York formerly and now live in North Carolina, but I’ve never been to Chicago and I’m excited to be there for the conference.

Eric:

Awesome. Yeah, and where the conferences. It’s walking distance, if you like walking, to Navy Pier. So… it’s cool. We’re going to do this interview style and I kind of gave a brief introduction about you, but why don’t you just give me an idea about what kind of websites you run and maybe touch on how much are you using Facebook to drive traffic to those sites?

Jenny:

Absolutely so I created the Melrose Family – It is almost eight years now. I feel like a dinosaur when I say that, but I was working full time at an inner city school district. I had just had my first daughter and I kind of lost myself as a new mother, so I started creating recipes and projects that I was doing with her to kind of find myself, find my own voice and soon found after getting started that there was this whole like inner world of blogging. So I started to network with different bloggers and kind of understand how they were starting to monetize and grow. It took me quite some time because I was obviously raising a new born, also working full time and once we got to a place where I started to feel really comfortable pitching brands, which is what I will be speaking about at Type-A, that it replaced my teaching salary. I was ready to leave to say the least.

Jenny:

I changed; teaching had changed. I still loved what I did, but it was just very different than when I started and I needed something different. So once it replaced my teaching salary, we were able to leave New York, move down to North Carolina just outside of Charlotte, which is where we live now. And I was able to start blocking full time. I’m able to be there for my kids. I was actually, for my preschooler, which is my youngest daughter, I was Room Mom last year, which (whispers) never be Room Mom – very overwhelmed. Um, but it was an amazing experience that I now ran my schedule if I need it to be somewhere, if they had something going on, I could do that. Whereas when I was a full time teacher myself, I wasn’t there for or for the first day of school pictures because I had to be in school myself as a teacher, so I often felt like I missed out on a lot of those kind of things. I don’t having the opportunity now to be able to run my blog full time and also do this other side where I’m helping other bloggers now you’d grow and monetize their site. I’m able to really control my schedule when I work and when I’m able to be there for my girls. So I love what I do. Which helps.

Eric:

Right. When you’ve lived in New York in New York City?

Jenny:

No, we’re about an hour north of New York City. I was um, I grew up right around there and we, I had for college and moved away, but ended up coming back and got a teaching job right after I was married literally a week after I think it was. And we thought that I’d just be a teacher; everyone in my family is a teacher: my sister, my sister in law, and my mom had always watched our kids, so it was just that was what you did. You became a teacher and you just were a teacher for the next 40 years of your life and that was just not in my foreseeable future and I knew that so this really gave me that opportunity.

Eric:

I only asked, and we didn’t talk about this beforehand, but I’m, I’m in New York, but on the other side of the state in Buffalo. So I was just wondering what part of the state you’re in

Jenny:

Yeah, my husband’s originally from Rochester.

Eric:

Oh cool. Very close by an actually in a race there next month, in Rochester. All right. So yeah, this whole webinar’s about Facebook and the algorithm changes and you know, there’s that whole, I’m sure you’re heard this saying, “don’t build your house on someone else’s land” and with Facebook and these algorithm changes and I hear a lot of people that are giving up and not giving up on you know their site and their content and their brand, but giving up on Facebook as a traffic driver. What do you think about that? Should people give up or are there things that they can do to still use Facebook effectively.

Jenny:

I definitely feel that people should not give up. The Melrose Family, which is my lifestyle site, has about 72,000 followers that I had been growing over the past eight years, so I’m not someone that has, you know, millions of followers has been able to grow this huge Facebook page. I have a decent size Facebook page. I have found that there are other ways to use Facebook to drive traffic. I was actually just doing a report yesterday; I was working on it for a brand that I’ve worked with and I pulled up all my impressions and all of the data that I had from pinterest and Google analytics, everything, and even with my smaller ish Facebook page the biggest traffic, most impressions, was coming from Facebook and it wasn’t coming from Facebook posts. It was coming from live broadcasting because I am seeing, and have been seeing, a tremendous amount of reach that comes from live broadcasting because Facebook wants you using their platform.

Jenny:

They are looking to then push that out further to your audience, whereas in the past or even with the algorithm now they are hiding your content from your audience because it is a business page and it is not the friends and family. Wel, they are now taking those Facebook live broadcast and showing it to more of your audience and you also then have the ability to target your audience based on who’s viewing. There’s just a lot of data that Facebook can provide and I know people are getting frustrated and they’re saying to me, but I’m not seeing any reach. I’m barely seeing anything at all. Your audience, it’s still there. There’s two point one billion users on Facebook – they are there. It’s just your going to have to find a different way to teach them to find your content and to come to you. You’re not just going to randomly show up in their feed anymore. They’re going to see their friends and family and the kind of conversations that Facebook is looking to push where it’s more personal, so if you have a business page, it’s going to become… hopefully you’ve been building your list, you can email your list and let them know what kind of changes you are going to be making on your Facebook page so that they know what to expect and where to come to find your content.

Eric:

Talking about your users: they were used to seeing your content one way Facebook kind of took that away and they stop seeing your site so much. How do you then get to them and say, I’m going live. Um, you know, that how do you get to them and tell them that you’re doing more live videos and such.

Jenny:

One of the biggest things that I push on clients that I work with, um, students that take my courses is that you have to be building your list. You have to be growing your email list. If you’re not, and relying on Facebook, instagram, whatever else it might be, you’re going to hurt yourself in the end because you’re not going to be able to continuously bring those people that were coming to your site back to your site. Now, if you do have a list and you’re still continuing to grow that list, you can send them an email and let them know, “hey listen, Facebook has made some changes, but this is what I’m going to be doing. I’m going to be live broadcasting every Wednesday at 11:00 AM eastern and you want to make sure that you come by the broadcast because I will be answering your personal questions about this Italian recipe that is most popular on my site.”

Jenny:

Whatever it might be. Whatever your content is making it so that it hits on those pain points that your audience is coming to you for and solves that problem with the live broadcast. Now with your live broadcast, making it consistent, having it on the same time every day; now a lot of clients that I work with are moms and they say to me (some are even homeschooling!), “well, I can’t go live. I don’t know how my kids are going to be behaving at the time.” Trying to be able to find that time, whether it is 8:00 when they go to bed or 9:00 just – some time. Once a week, if you can try to commit to it or once every other week. Live broadcasting has been such a huge difference in both of my businesses because my audience knows, likes and trusts me. They know who I am. They watch me with my almost five year old now I’m doing a recipe and it’s not so much about that recipe that entertains them and gets them hooked and liking us. It’s more the interactions that they see between my daughter and I. They see me parenting when she starts, you know, making a crazy sounds because she’s being silly because she sees herself live on the camera and that’s what they’re looking for it. They’ve really got to know who you are and what the reality is.

Jenny:

People are so used to now and he’s going on instagram and seeing the beautiful photos. Well, let’s be honest: that’s not what my house really looks like. Especially if I’m shooting, you know, I’m doing a recipe with my daughter. That’s not what it looks like at dinnertime They want to see what it really looks like and live broadcasting provides that opportunity: it’s why people love reality television so much. You give them a glimpse into your life and when you do that, you create a loyal audience members that are not only going to come to your site any time, maybe you have a new recipe or a new project, but when you then create a produc,t they’re going to buy from you. Those are going to be your people that are going to continuously buy anything that you put out as far as product wise.

Eric:

So, regarding that consistency with the date and the time. How do you… how do you identify when to do that? I have, I have an agency that we work with and they do a live broadcast – I think it’s, I think it’s weekly and it’s like Wednesday at 2:00 PM and every week he invites me and every week I say no because I have a finance call Wednesdays at 2:00 PM and I feel bad that I can’t make it. So did you, when you started, did you say I’m going to do this Wednesdays at 2:00 PM or did you kind of bounce around a little to see how your audience reacted to the different times?

Jenny:

So one of the great things right now that Facebook is going right now is they are pushing out polls still. Polls, any time you ask a question, so I polled my audience. I knew that there were certain times in the day where I wouldn’t have my four year old home, or where I knew that she would be sidetracked by my husband or whatever it might be. So I offered up, different time slots that they could choose from and what we, I made sure that when you include it, you’re including the time slots that are comfortable for you. But also I included a time slot that got a ton of attention and I had put on the option was “no, you talked too much as it is.” So they all reacted to that which then pushed out that pull to more people but they all also told me what time works best for them. I have since kind of tweaked it here and there based on audience attendance and what works with my schedule. But I did start off by asking them. So they felt like they were part of it. You obviously can’t accommodate everyone but if you’re east coast and you’re trying to take care of west coast, you need to be having that conversation with them to kind of get a feel for what might work best for their schedules, especially with you are looking for those loyal people to be there constantly.

Jenny:

The nice thing I can say is that even though my audience may be able, because I do my live broadcast on my jenny melrose Facebook page with free trading every Tuesday at 11:00 AM eastern and that’s actually what I turned into a podcast episode. So what I have done, if they know that I’m going live at 11, if they can’t come in at 11, they’ll stop back Tuesday, later on the day and they’d been trained to just go to videos and they know that my most recent video is going to be there on my tab where they’re going to be able to get the training. I also, I’m repurposing this, which is something I definitely think you should be doing. You don’t want to just create this live broadcast and it be just for Facebook. You want to be able to repurpose it and use it for multiple things. I use it for my podcast. I use it for a blog post. You can upload it to youtube. There are so many different ways that you can use the content that you are doing via live broadcasting rather than having to go on six different social media platforms and have to create new content every single time.

Eric:

Nice, alright so, I have my page, I emailed my list and saying I’m going to start doing live broadcasts. I need to know, I’d like to know about to know when you can make it. I have my Facebook poll, I’m getting responses. Um, and I can tell you also on the type-A side, when we send an email to our list, we, and we know every email: this is the main thing we want to get done from this email and it’s amazing. We send an email saying, hey, did you join our affiliate program? And as soon as Rachel hits send, I start seeing all those affiliate applications or you know, “did you apply to the faculty?” And she hits send. When you send that email, know your leaders definitely do listen to you. So if your email says, I’m going to start doing Facebook live videos, go vote on when you can make it, they’re going to hop over and vote. So I’ve done all that stuff and now it’s like, oh crap, I promised them I’m going to do this live broadcast? What the heck do I do? What are your. What are your top tips?

Jenny:

I would definitely, the biggest thing before you start off: you have to get organized. You have to have an outline of where you’re going to go because there is no guarantee that there will be anyone there with you and the thing to keep in mind is” that’s OK. Because what happens is even if you’re talking to yourself, Facebook continues to push it out over time. So people are going to see that content and if you’re smart like we talked about, you’re going to be repurposing it for other uses, but the big thing that you want to do is really know where you’re going to go. Have a direct outline kind of in front of you with like key points that you want to hit on. One of the things that I also am huge on is having using little ways to definitely try to engage my audience: to get them involved in the conversation that I’m having and it’s not just necessarily a conversation with myself, but I’m trying to have them have a conversation with me.

Jenny:

So there’s very specific things that I will actually do throughout my broadcast trying to get them to engage with me because when you get them to engage with you, it pushes out the reach of that live broadcast. So one of the things that I know that we said we were going to provide your attendees with (and people who are watching the replay) is my live broadcasting starter guide. Within that guide (because I’m going to kind of give you some bullet points to hit on) you will find a complete list and exactly what it means. But when you are doing your live broadcast, you want to start off – the first thing is your description. You want to make sure that your description kind of gives people a question that hits on a pain point and then gives them the answer as to what you’re going to cover in your live broadcast.

Jenny:

And you can do this before you go live. I also a huge… you’ve heard these this already about growing your email list – it is so important that every time you do a live broadcast, you should be connecting it to your lead magnet, to the thing that you’re giving to your audience as a Freebie in exchange for their email address so that if someone isn’t on your list yet, you were continuing to grow that list. So you should have a link in the description that says, you know, “make sure you grab our checklists.” So if you’re talking about meal planning and you go through things, they are then able to go to your link that you put in the description, be able to print out that checklist so they can keep it up on the refrigerator. Anything like that where you can do something that’s connected to something that you give for free to grow that list is going to be really important.

Eric:

So we’re talking about engaging the audience
: is it always a… you prompt them with a question? And then, are you reading their answers or do you ever do like a, like, “give me a thumbs up on this and I heart on this and a sad face for this other thing?”

Jenny:

Yeah – That is definitely part of what I do. The question that I ask in the description is more to just peak their interest to get them to click to watch the rest of the video. Then when I get started, right away, I’m going to hit them with an attention grabber that kind of goes off to that pain point, asking that question again. I have the habit, because I have a weekly show, of saying, “Hey, as you’re coming in in the comments, just give me a ‘hey’ give me a ‘good morning'” (because I go early in the morning, especially for my West Coasters) and I always tell them so I can give examples so I can tell, you know, ’cause I, so that way I know who’s here with me, whatever it might be, so that as soon as they’re coming in, they’re already being given or directions being told – they know how I’m expecting them to interact with me. Now you can have a question. Something like, um,

Jenny:

“What is your…” like let’s say you’re going to do a recipe and… “what’s the most popular item in your pantry that you use in every recipe possible?” Something like that. Where immediately, they come in and they know to answer a question they’re already starting to engage with you. So once you have that attention grabber that you’ve kind of talked about as soon as the live broadcast starts and you’ve said your “good mornings” or said, “hey,” you’re going to go into the promise: what you actually backed to deliver to them. What’s the transformation that you’re looking at a have? A transformation that they’re going to have from that live broadcast. I know some people would probably think [inaudible], “I created a recipe. What is the transformation for me?” Well, that transformation is you’re gonna show them how to do a recipe in 20 minutes or less so that the transformation is they get more time with their kids instead of having to stand in the kitchen all day, making a two hour recipe.

Jenny:

So that’s your next piece is to go on to the promise depending upon, um, when you were starting. I don’t really do this as much as I used to, but I used to really explain who I was: establishing my credibility, explaining why I had the opportunity and could talk about whatever it was that I was going to talk about. Now I don’t do this as much now because I feel like I’ve been live broadcasting probably for consistently probably nine months at this point. They know they’re coming to me every single week and what they’re coming to me for. So I don’t do a ton of explaining that. But once you first start, I would definitely give some credibility and it can be as simple as I used to be a, um, I’m a trained Michelin chef, but now I am teaching home chefs how to be, or home cooks, how to become home chefs or something to the effect of I have 12 children and I homeschool all of them.

Jenny:

So I’m going to create ways for you to be able to be as productive as possible. That’s actually one of my clients that I work with, so yeah, no, that is going to get it all done. That’s actually a funny story behind that. But she didn’t realize that that was what set her apart from all the other bloggers out there. She couldn’t figure out the one thing that sets her apart and I’m like, “do you remember that you have 12 kids at home and homeschool all, right?” And she was like, “yeah, but that’s just my every day.” I’m like, “no no no no no.. it’s why everyone wants to know how the heck you are surviving. This is not an everyday kind of thing.”

Eric:

What about coming up with these weekly topics? How were you deciding… do you already know what you’re doing next week and you know, in the middle of May, how far out are you going? How are you… picking these topics and do you shuffle them around.

Jenny:

So I would love to tell you that I am that organized, that I know that far in advance. I am usually choosing my topic the weekend before for Tuesday’s broadcast, but the way that I’m doing that is I’m looking my analytics, I’m looking to see what does my audience already coming to me for. I’m also making sure that I have a lead magnet in place that I can easily set, correlate, to whatever it is that I’m going to broadcast about. So if I’m noticing that I have this Oreo cupcake recipe that is so popular on pinterest and it would be great for Google to see a video embedded into the content of me preparing these Oreo cupcakes live, then I will do that as my broadcast for the week. You want to be doing your content that you already know that your audience is coming for. I actually talked to someone earlier today who is very popular on Youtube. We were talking this morning and she said to me, she goes, “people get scared off by youtube, but they don’t realize that if something is already doing really well on Google because of SEO or it’s doing well on pinterest or does well on Facebook, it’s going to do well on youtube. It’s not as scary as everyone thinks.” So that goes across the board. If you have something that’s already driving traffic to do a live broadcast, which just makes sense on that actual topic.

Eric:

So, one topic, and I liked the idea of holding off until a couple days before because a lot of times there’s new information that comes out in the world. Such as, I messaged you a couple hours ago. So for those of you who haven’t heard Facebook is… just announced a subscription service and not like the one your crazy Aunt shares, that if you don’t share the status, you have to pay to use Facebook. But they announced a subscription service where… you could pay $4.99 a month and subscribe to a content producer’s, um, you know, videos and they’re kind of spinning it as “it’s showing support for that content producer.” The person producing the content keeps a hundred percent of that money, which is different from Youtube and Apple who take 30% of any subscriptions. So they’re, you know, Facebook is trying to get these producers away from Youtube and into Facebook. So what do you think about this, what you, how do you think people are going to react to it and are you anticipating any changes on your side, based on this newfound information?

Jenny:

So I’ve seen the writing on the wall for quite some time that I needed to incorporate video, whether it was on insta stories, if it was on Facebook, whatever it might be, I needed to find a way to get live video into my content. Now Facebook, on top of that subscription has also, some of you might notice, have that new watch feature where if the video portion, there are already some large bloggers that are part of that program where anytime they put up a new video, you get a notification saying, Hey, your, your um, whatever watched channel you follow has put up a new video. Um, I am Baker has a watch channel so far and so does, um, the Holderness family. They do those funny singing videos. Um, but you can apply to have a channel which I have done waiting to, to hopefully get passed through and they’re only opening up to a certain amount of people.

Jenny:

And I think that even with the article that you sent me today, they’re talking about right now they’re testing it with 10 people in the US and UK. It’s very, very minimum that they’re trying it out with. But I think what they’re really trying to do is they know that video is the way to go and they want to become the platform that has all of the video and everything that people are coming for. But I think that what they’ve decided is they want it underneath a different, almost ,tab, let’s say, at Facebook. They don’t want it to be part of the the feed that your personal profile where they’re talking about they want family and friends and everything else were these open conversations that are heartfelt. They want it underneath this different tab. Now, if they came to me and said, hey, we’re going to give you a watch channel and hey, you’re going to have the option to allow your subscribers to get your content for five bucks a month. I know for sure because I have trained my audience to come to my content to want that content that I would wholeheartedly sign up for it and I do believe that my audience would be willing to pay five bucks a month for it. So it gives us as content creators, the ability to make some money off of our videos like youtubers do with those ads. And then it’s also giving us kind of a reason to come on to Facebook to create the videos rather than only doing it on youtube.

Eric:

So if anyone is on the Webinar and has questions, there’s a questions button – feel free to hit it and I’m keeping an eye on it if there’s questions coming in I’ll, I’ll shoot them over to you so, I’m going to… but I have a question myself because in a few weeks I’m speaking at a local college about affiliate marketing, I decided that I’m going to Facebook live this thing and so I’m going to have someone come with me just to kind of man the camera which, is my phone and I have to get over this idea that this equipment isn’t very sophisticated. I’m not using any software to like you know, to switch back and forth from me speaking to broadcasting my screen and such. But the thing I don’t understand is, and I might be answering my question as I asked it because I’m watching the questions panel on GoToWebinar, is: how do I know that there’s interactions going on while I’m giving my presentation? I have to focus on this classroom of students ,teach them about affiliate marketing and out of the corner of my eye, watch Facebook?

Jenny:

So, because you are presenting to a live, real people (not just virtually), I would think definitely pay attention to the people that you have to broadcast to. When I have done, I’ve done a local radio show for months over August and they would live broadcast it while we were actually doing the radio show and we had someone else that was manning the questions and he would kind of like, in the middle of us going back and forth for the radio show broadcast would then say, “hey, so and so on Facebook says, ‘……'” So they were manning that. Not us trying to have a conversation and still watch Facebook live and whatever else is going on, so my recommendation to you and pay attention to those people that are there. If you have someone holding your phone, which I’m honestly like broadcast wise, you don’t need to spend a ton of money. You don’t need to have this huge camera or this great set up or a studio. In that live broadcasting guide that we’re actually going to link to, I give you the tools that I use and everything’s under 80 bucks.

Jenny:

There is nothing that’s on there, and even a web cam that’s on there that’s not that expensive but works really well for what I am looking to do so you don’t have to spend a ton of money. I would say that if you are doing it virtually, and even if you’re doing an interview with someone virtually, so there’s not students in front of you, I would say definitely interact and you know, you’ll find the time to see a question go past and say, OK, they’re going to finish what they’re saying. I’m going to go back and say, hey, so Julie’s said, asked this question and I’m going to read it to them and they’re going to be able to answer to live for us. Um, I definitely, like if you ever listened to any of my podcast episodes which were Facebook live, you can see me like I’m practically having conversation with the people that are live with me because they’ll ask a question and then we’ll just continue it. And if I didn’t explain it fully, they’ll pop back in asking me to go a little bit deeper on what I’m giving them as an example or whatever else it might be.

Jenny:

Did that help at all?

Eric:

Yeah… I’m… I’ve done it before when Facebook live, like just started. So if I screwed it up then it doesn’t matter because I was like, not one of the first ones, but it was early on. And now Facebook live has been around for so long I feel like there a certain level of professionalism that viewers expect and I just hope I can bring that. So, um, you know, we don’t have any other questions right now. So why don’t you just kind of talk me through: alright, I’m going to do it. I’m going to do a Facebook live. Why don’t you just kind of recap what are the, what are the steps to take to pull off a successful one?

Jenny:

The first thing I was actually thinking when you were saying that about doing it to be live audience on coordinate it with instastories. So what I would do is I would go to an instastory being like, “hey, getting ready to go live on Facebook over on the Facebook page. Do you have any questions? Please put them in the comments. I will be checking back after I’m done going live to this room full of students to answer any questions that you have.” That way it’s king of, your teaching your audience to go to instagram. You’re teaching your audience to go to Facebook and you’re also just giving them a heads up that you are going to be coming back in. You could even do that in the description prior to going live. Just tell them you know, “this is performed in front of a live audience; I will check back after I’m done presenting any questions that you have that you may feel the need to ask while we are live, whatever it might be.” That way you’re just kind of laying the foundation for them as to what to expect and why they may or may or may not feel ignored. You’re kind of addressing it ahead of time that you’re not ignoring them, but do you have live people in front of you that you have to look at, and kind of interact with.

Eric:

So, what do you think about making a Facebook event for my future live broadcast so people can RSVP, say they’re interested and such. Have you seen that and have you seen success with that?

Jenny:

Yes, so I was doing an event prior to my Facebook live broadcasts every single week for a little while and then I switched to software that actually pushes into Facebook; that does it for me. So you can create – let’s start with the event. You can create, I would recommend creating that event probably two to four days out so that it gives them the opportunity to see it. They also can, then, um, if they say that they’re interested or they’re going to come, it will give them a notification. Now the software that I’m talking about that actually does that for you so that you don’t have to set up an extra is BeLive, it’s belive.com, I believe is what it is (it’s actually BeLive.tv). It is so simple to use. You can broadcast whether it’s you by yourself, whether you’re going to do an interview or even if you want to do some screen sharing, you can push in, live to a Facebook group or Facebook page and it creates that event for you the second that you create the broadcast.

Jenny:

So for example, I will do a training into my membership site and we do it into Facebook for them because that’s where they all are. Well, the second that I created that broadcast and gave the link to person that was coming on with me, it’s now in the group and they can see it, so they’ve all been hitting interested, interested in interested because what that actually does is it the BeLive event that gets created will give a notification five minutes before it starts. But event notification that you create within Facebook only does it an hour before and let’s be honest, if you’re a mom, in an hour, there’s so much that can possibly happen, but if I get a quick “ding” five minutes beforehand I’m like, “Oh let me finish reading this email or doing whatever I’m doing,” and then I’m ready to pop on live with that person

Eric:

Yeah, I get distracted; my phone, 10 minutes before a meeting my phone “ding”s, it reminds me about my conference call and then 12 minutes goes by and I’m like, “oh crap, I forgot to get on the call.” So an hour, that’s a lifetime. So yeah, I was looking at BeLive primarily for the interview aspect, something that we’re looking to get into. So I’ll check it out.

Jenny:

I want to see and BeLive is I believe $29 a month, but it is definitely, I think the least expensive option that was out there. At one point I was using the Zoom in coordination, you had to have the ability to have webinars in order to use Zoom to push into Facebook and I think that made it like $55 a month in order to do it that way. And BeLive, honestly, it’s just the interface is much easier. It’s better for the people that you are interviewing. It’s, I definitely like it. You can kind of like pop up different things like you can pop up any comments that come up so they can all see it on the screen. It just looks more professional

Eric:

Alright, Larry’s asking about taking your Facebook live video and repurposing on Facebook. So how much of that does Facebook take care of for you and how much of it should you make an effort to do yourself?

Jenny:

Wwhen you were done with the broadcast, you want to definitely go into… once the broadcast is done, it posts your page, you can go in and edit and under advanced settings you can go into more information and be able to pop in. So it’ll be easier for people to find. There’s tags. There’s, if it’s a short Facebook live video and you could actually do, um, I can’t think of what the word is when you see the words of what they’re saying. I can’t think of anything.

Eric:

The transcription?

Jenny:

Oh! Thank you. Yeah. I could not think of the word, the transcription of what they’ve actually said, so you can add that in after the fact if it’s not that wide of a broadcast and, or not that long and you can go through and quickly transcribe it so that it’s on there. There’s all these different options that you can have after the fact now if you were to take,, as far as repurposing, so I’m not really quite sure if this is what you meant or not as far as repurposing. Um, so let’s say what I do is once the Facebook live is done, I downloaded it to my computer. I then take that and I will upload it and you can upload it to editing software so that if you wanted to cut it down or you want it to trim out a piece of it to put on instagram insta-stories.

Jenny:

Or if you wanted to put it, you know, trim out edit pieces to put it up on Youtube. You can also, right within Facebook without having to download it, you can embed it so that you could actually, there’s the dot, dot dot and the top right corner live on Facebook and you’re playing it and if you click on that, it’ll give you the option to download or it’ll also say, “Embed.” And you can then take that, HTML that they’re giving you to embed and put it right into a blog post. So if you go to my content, you’ll see that there’s videos that are down towards the bottom of pretty much every episode that I do and it’s because it’s coming from that Facebook live.

Eric:

I’m wondering if you embed a video on the website, and I went to your website and I played the video, would Facebook then more like be more likely to show me your future content as well?

Jenny:

Yes. Because what can also happen is you have the ability to put the comments there as well so that they can even comment on that Facebook post, which is the Facebook live video. So it continues to gather all of that information, all of that data. Um, which if you were using Facebook ads, it is amazing, like there’s just so much information that it gives you, it tells you how, how long the video was watched, where they’re actually going out to where they’re coming in. Um, and then you have the ability that if you have a product and you’re trying to promote something that you can then re target the audience that was watching your Facebook live videos for more than five minutes because obviously if they’re watching for more than five minutes, they’re committed to your content, they’ve probably gotten a decent amount of information from you so you can re target them possibly with an ad for Type-A Conference to get their tickets or whatever it might be, depending upon your site and your products.

Eric:

That just totally blew my mind. And it makes sense: if they were watching for more than five minutes, they’re interested, (or, their kid just covered the table with scotch tape, like one of my coworkers kids did). All right. So Larry has another question and maybe you can give us an example of this. And actually this is a perfect example, is our perfect time for you to give us an example. He’s asking how do you capture those emails, you know, so you have an offer for the people watching this webinar are either live or recorded. So why don’t you, instead of telling Larry what to do, why don’t you show him, how do you capture emails?

Jenny:

All right, so, um, as like a screen-share, because I don’t know if I know how to do that.

Eric:

Nope; like, if you were doing this Facebook live video and you wanted to make them give the offer for your video equipment list,

Jenny:

OK, so what I would do is right in the description, I would put the url to the landing page. So a landing page is where I’m telling them exactly what they’ll get. So with, um, I’m trying to think like as an example, like if you were to go to jennymelrose.com/live-video-equipment-list, not exactly the best thing to be would’ve been smarter if there were any spaces in there, but especially when you’re live. But if you were to go to that, you’re going to go to a landing page where it actually just says, “get my five dirt cheap tool they use to create all my videos” and it says, “show me” you click on that button and then going to ask you for your name and email address. Once you give me your name and email, I then deliver it directly to you. So I use lead pages, landing pages, and I am a convert kit girl.

Jenny:

So convert kit delivers the Freebie that I’ll be giving you. Then what has happened now is because you gave me your email and exchange for this Freebie, you are going to be on my list of subscribers so that if I were to do something else that would make sense for live broadcasting, online business owners, you would probably start, you would get an email from me and you’re going to be told when you get that first download, um, that how often I email what I’ll be sending you. Just with that, you know, what the expectations are and you’re not going to get an email from me, you know, twice a day on the hour or something crazy.

Eric:

Awesome; so, the URL in the video description. And then, also, announce it during the video and maybe make the URLs a little shorter, sweeter

Jenny:

Yes; in that live broadcasting starter guide that you were going to get with it is that, um, there’s a piece in here where I talk about the actual, like checklist of what you should have. And one of the things that I talk about is that you should be pretty much as soon as you establish your credibility, you’re then going to say to them, right from the beginning, “Hey, right up in the description, be sure that you go and grab my checklist for meal planning.” Whatever it is that’s up there that you’re giving them for their lead magnet. So you’re staying at your calling it out in the beginning, and then you’re also going to remind them at the end because you don’t know where people are coming in. People sometimes will come into the broadcast from the very beginning while others may come in 10, 20 minutes into your broadcast, depending upon how long it is. So because of that, you want to make sure that you are letting them know that it’s there in the beginning and then also again at the end.

Eric:

So do you have any other, anything else you wanted to share? We don’t have any more questions right now. I think it was great. Oh, and Larry’s saying, “Hold up a sign that says your url.” I think the Be… Is it the BeLive? Allows you to like superimpose graphics and everything so you could make it like a Billy Mays commercial…

Jenny:

Yeah. It has your branding on it too, then you come then pull up any questions. It’s definitely like I love the BeLive broadcasting software is great for all of that stuff.

Eric:

Yes, we will be checking it out. So, um, in the meantime, if you’re watching this live, we’re going to be posting the replay to the Type-A Tribe members only section a couple of days. Depends how fast I get around to editing it. But check out jennymelrose.com/live-video-equipment-list with dashes between those words. Live video equipment list. I’m just going to post that to the Tribe Facebook group as well. Jenny, it was such a pleasure. You totally blew my mind with some of these things. I’ve taken so many notes, um, I will be doing, not my first, but probably my second Facebook life, a Tuesday, April 10th at 4:30 PM eastern. I hope it goes as well as this one. This was fantastic. So thank you. Um, like I said, pleasure and look forward to seeing you in Chicago this fall.

Jenny:

Yes, me too! I am excited and I hope that whoever is live or watching the replay that you definitely make sure to come see me at Type-A, I will be talking about how to work with brands. It’s one of my passions.

Eric:

We’ll push that will put your, um, your, your presentation information, um, also in the Tribe, so thanks very much. On next month’s Webinar, we’re talking about fitness at work, which is awesome because I work out every morning and sit at my desk for nine hours. So we need to keep moving during the day. So thanks everyone, and we’ll see you next month.

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Jenny is a former reading specialist who “retired” from her teaching career when her blogging income far exceeded her salary. Through hard work and dedication, her lifestyle blog, The Melrose Family, became regularly sought out by nationally recognized brands such as Neutrogena, Smuckers, Glad, Costco, Stanley Steamer, Sara Lee and many more. The unique pitching process she developed for working with brands, transformed an empty editorial calendar into one that was completely booked months in advance.

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